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The FCC is cracking down on 'auto warranty' robocalls

The FCC is cracking down on 'auto warranty' robocalls



Robocalls are an epidemic. Here's why there's no quick fixReplayMore Videos ... (16 Videos)Robocalls are an epidemic. Here's why there's no quick fixFood bank demand skyrockets as cash-strapped Americans seek help over inflationDoes a slowing housing market mean homes will get any cheaper? European Central Bank makes big move with rare interest rate hike'Striking pay gap:' Top US company CEOs earn this much more than their average employees Nord Stream 1 makes Europe more reliant on Russian gas. Here's whyCould Netflix's ad-supported plan free the company from the 'value trap'?See 'Law & Order' star's nude Peloton commercialSee which airports lead the nation in flight cancellations'I'm losing my mind': Chinese depositor loses life savings in bankPeople are revealing their salaries to this TikTok star. Would you?Business professor says that Elon Musk is on the hook for $45 billion'Worse than we anticipated:' CNN reporter breaks down inflation dataAnderson Cooper and William Shatner flip out over new NASA imagesRecession is likely coming. How bad will it be?Child care costs are rising. See how parents are copingWashington (CNN Business)US telecom providers will now be required to block millions of illegal robocalls a day advertising extended vehicle warranties, the Federal Communications Commission said Thursday, taking aim at a group of individuals accused of sending more than 8 billion such messages since 2018.

Thursday's order by the FCC requires voice providers to stop carrying calls the agency has linked to 13 individuals and six companies, mostly based in Texas and California but also in such far-flung places as Hungary.The robocalls produced by the group typically begin with recorded lines such as, "We've been trying to reach you concerning your car's extended warranty," the FCC order said. Such calls represented the single largest source of consumer complaints to the FCC in each of the past two years, adding up to thousands of complaints a year.As part of its scheme, the group bought access to nearly half a million phone numbers from more than 200 area codes in the fall and winter of 2020, the FCC said, and then used them to make it appear to recipients that the robocalls were coming from local numbers. Read MoreThe group is still blasting out millions of illegal calls every day, the FCC added.Though the FCC had previously notified US telecom companies about the robocalls, Thursday's order is the first to force carriers to stop transmitting them. By unmasking the specific people and entities behind the calls, the FCC has provided the necessary information to block them, said Acting FCC Enforcement Bureau Chief Loyaan Egal in a statement.With few exceptions, automated calls made without the recipient's consent are illegal under US law.In light of Thursday's order, telecom companies that continue to carry the illegal calls may be held liable themselves, the FCC said.


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