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New York Mayor Eric Adams wants Jamie Dimon to ride the subway to work

New York Mayor Eric Adams wants Jamie Dimon to ride the subway to work



Return to work burdens Americans amid high gas pricesReplayMore Videos ... (16 Videos)Return to work burdens Americans amid high gas pricesDoctor says cow's milk can be used as baby formula substitute in 'dire circumstances'Not lovin' it: How Russians reacted to McDonald's closing'I do not have an explanation': Pentagon official shows video of unidentified objectRyanair CEO blasts Boeing in expletive-laden remarks about slow delivery of 737 jetsHow China's workers are faring during a tumultuous supply chain crisisSnapchat CEO surprises Otis College's newest graduates by paying off their student loansWhat shape might the next recession take?Stablecoins faltering amid crypto market volatilityMother describes 'anxiety provoking' search for baby formulaUS farmers stressed amid severe drought and inflationAirbnb CEO: 'We're not pulling on the brakes, we're stepping on the gas' 'It feels overwhelming': Business owner on the impact of inflationMeet the 100-year-old man who's worked at the same company for 84 yearsThis toxic lake has enough lithium to supply US electric vehicles for decadesWatch what this Kawasaki factory in Nebraska did to attract workersNew York (CNN Business)New York Mayor Eric Adams is begging the city's business leaders, including JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon, to ride the subway to work. Adams is pushing to bring people back to New York offices after years of working from home.

"We're going to get him on a train," Adams told the Financial Times in an interview. "We're going to get everyone on the train. He understands the need of getting his people back and leading from the front." JPMorgan (JPM) didn't immediately respond to CNN Business' request for comment.Adams is trying to corral workers back to offices just as the city elevated its Covid-19 status to "High" on Tuesday. That means the city is experiencing "high community spread" resulting in "substantial pressure" on the city's health care system, according to the health department."We're telling our corporate leaders: 'Hey, get on the train!'" Adams said in the interview. "We need to advertise that New York is back."Read MoreRoughly 40% of workers in New York City are currently in the office on a weekday, according to a recent survey conducted by the Partnership for New York City. The survey also found that remote work is "here to stay," with nearly 80% of employers instituting a hybrid office/remote model. Another concern from employees about returning to work is crime. About one-third of employers said that reducing homelessness would be "most effective" in encouraging workers to return. Big banks typically like to stick together on major policy decisions. But as Wall Street grapples with heading back-to-offices, a rare chasm is growing between the finance giants.Goldman Sachs (GS), Bank of America (BAC) and Morgan Stanley (MSPRE) are taking hardline approaches, requiring employees to come into the office five days a week. However, Citigroup (C) announced that the majority of the company's 210,000 employees will be allowed to go hybrid, with three days in the office. JPMorgan has reportedly eased its return to office policies too.


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